Wednesday, July 16, 2014
whisper-norbury:

The person naming these streets either really liked Robert Louis Stevenson or was running out of ideas.

whisper-norbury:

The person naming these streets either really liked Robert Louis Stevenson or was running out of ideas.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014
The Robert Louis Stevenson panel in the Great Tapestry of Scotland. Stitched by Stitchers wi’ Smeddum from Tranent, Pentcaitland.

The Robert Louis Stevenson panel in the Great Tapestry of Scotland. Stitched by Stitchers wi’ Smeddum from Tranent, Pentcaitland.

Tuesday, July 8, 2014
Stevenson’s Marriage License.

Stevenson’s Marriage License.

RLS with his parents, Fanny and Lloyd.

RLS with his parents, Fanny and Lloyd.

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

lamaescriptoriographico:

t-shirt (hand-painted) - robert louis stevenson

Friday, June 13, 2014

robertharrisonblake:

A video showcasing my interest in, and collection of, the works of Robert Louis Stevenson. In this episode I talk about the author and Treasure Island in particular, then take a look at my collection.

Please subscribe to catch the latest uploads: collections, reviews, opinion, all eclectic/old/alternative…

Sunday, June 1, 2014
gothicabooks:

‘Hyde,’ by Daniel Levine – NYTimes.com
Robert Louis Stevenson’s “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” is an oblique and artful Gothic tale framed as a detective story.

gothicabooks:

‘Hyde,’ by Daniel Levine – NYTimes.com

Robert Louis Stevenson’s “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” is an oblique and artful Gothic tale framed as a detective story.

Thursday, May 8, 2014

Was a Scottish Warlock the Inspiration for Mr. Hyde?

pavigetslaid:

To the great and good of seventeenth-century Edinburgh, Major Thomas Weir was the epitome of puritanical respectability. An esteemed preacher who railed against sin from his pulpit in the city’s West Bow thoroughfare, he and his sister Jean were considered so devout they were known locally as the “Bowhead Saints”.

Therefore, it came as something of a surprise to his devoted faithful when the Major confessed, at the age of 70, to leading a darker life as a warlock behind a string of horrendous crimes, including bestiality, incest, black magic, and necromancy.

His trial and subsequent execution for witchcraft in 1670 has gone down in the annals of Edinburgh’s folklore, but it appears Major Weir boasts an even more formidable legacy: it was his bizarre, schizophrenic life that Robert Louis Stevenson used as his inspiration for his most infamous of literary creations - Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

According to the BBC Four documentary Ian Rankin Investigates: Dr Jekyll the split personality of Major Weir both fascinated and terrified a young Stevenson, who was haunted by the ghost stories his nanny, known as “Cummy”, would tell him when he was little.

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